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Monthly Archives: September 2011



  • Employers’ indirect costs resulting from Employee Mental Illness is 4 fold greater than their direct costs for Employee healthcare. (1)
  • In spite of the fact that people with mental illness use the healthcare system much more often than does the general population, most (2/3) of Mental Illness is never recognized (diagnosed) or treated. (2)
  • Once diagnosed, Mental Illness is highly treatable with between 70 and 90 percent of people having significant reduction of symptoms and improved quality of life with a combination of medication, talk therapy and other supports. (2)
  • A major obstacle to recognizing mental health disorders is their lack of symptoms in the traditional sense of the word. (3)
  • Recognizing mental illness depends on an awareness of an individual’s functional status such as their social functioning or work performance.
  • Since there is evidence that even workers with mild or “sub-threshold” problems begin to show productivity problems early on – perhaps long before they experience other health consequences – employers are in a unique position to effect significant change in the way services are delivered. (1)
  • Over the past two decades The Balanced Scorecard has been widely employed as the Business Management tool of choice by most major employers worldwide. (4)
  • The Balanced Score Card aligns the goals of an Organization with the personal goals of its Employees for the purpose of achieving optimal performance at the Organizational level.  (5)
  • Systematic  measurements of performance against the Organization’s stated goals is an essential part of an effective Balanced Scorecard. (5)
  • Information contained within employee performance data, if viewed from a clinical perspective, will facilitate the early recognition and treatment of mental illness in a workforce. (1)
  • The early recognition and treatment of mental illness in a workforce yields a significant Return on Investment for Employers. (6)
  • Since there is evidence that even workers with mild or “sub-threshold” problems begin to show productivity problems early on – perhaps long before they experience other health consequences – employers are in a unique position to effect significant change in the way services are delivered.
  • With more than 2 decades of clinical experience as both a Primary Care Physician and a Mental Health Care Provider and a career commitment to optimizing the health and performance of his patients, this physician is in a unique position to help employers effect this change. (1)
  • This physician can show the stakeholders of any Organization how to realize the value of adding a clinical perspective to their Balanced Scorecard.
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